Sunday, February 12, 2012

Perky Perky

Perky. Perky. Perky.   I've talked death, politics, left and right wing, gray skies and I'm ready for perky.

Bright flowers fall into the perky category for me and there are some real beauties out there this year.  I'm going to borrow most of the photos from on line catalogs - give credit where credit is due - and the only endorsement I'm giving is to say the photos do look beautiful - - - and perky.

 This beauty is called "Amish Cockscomb" and it's featured at Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds www.rareseeds.com   This variety was discovered growing in an Amish garden near Arthur, IL. Beautiful large red heads on compact 1-foot tall plants.  

I haven't seen cockscomb growing in gardens in years.  I plant a few every few years and always wonder why I don't do it more.  Children love it and it really packs a punch in late summer when other flowers have stopped blooming.




The antique Sweet Pea "Queen of the Night" from Renee's Heirloom Garden www.reneesgarden.com  The Queen has super fragrant blend in the deepest shades of navy blue, mauve-blue, bicolor maroon and lilac, dark crimson and salmon pink.

This is grown as an annual up here and could grow to eight foot.

People shy aways from sweet peas for some reason.  There are also perennial varieties.  They won't grow where there are walnuts (sigh...)








The stunning Union Jack dahlia from 1882, is one of the world's oldest.  It's also known as the "Star of Denmark".  Featured in Old House Gardens, a heirloom bulb supplier  www.oldhousegardens.com  plus they have loads of information. 
 
The good thing about dahlias is you will have the bulbs from year to year (plus all the babies they produce.)  The bad thing about dahlias is they must be dug up in the fall/replanted in the spring. 
 
Nothing beats dahlias for the huge formal wow factor.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Campsis "Minnesota Red" Trumpet Creeper is one you may want to consider the fact it can grow in Zone 4 to 40 feet.  Do not plant where it can damage siding or trees.  I have mine planted on a twelve foot stump of an old tree.  This native vine  is from Brushwood Nursery at www.gardenvines.com                                                                      

 

 

 

 

Oakes Daylilies at www.oakesdaylilies.com is where I bought my stunning "Dorothy Lambert".   Registered in 1966, it is a vibrant rosy pink 6 inch flower that is often called tropical.  Anything but tender, it is hardy to Zone 4.
 
 
 
 
Hope you've enjoyed some bright perky flowers because tomorrow we have snow predicted and I'm so sure a little perky will be just the ticket.
 
“In my garden there is a large place for sentiment. My garden of flowers is also my garden of thoughts and dreams. The thoughts grow as freely as the flowers, and the dreams are as beautiful.”   Abram L. Urban
  
    

 
                
  

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